slam it to the left, shake it to the right



Erica, here. I post things I like. And I reblog a lot.


I also have:
twitter & 500px
Etsy Shop


Ask away
Posts tagged mental health

sciencenote:

The Science of Pornography Addiction - The internet’s drug of choice. 

A Girl Named Fred: how to love your depressed lover. 

tohellwiththeraggedy:

like—wildfire:

myyellowlight:

starsandsounds:

Last night I thought I kissed

the loneliness from out your belly button.
I thought I did, but later you sat up,
all bones and restless hands, and told me that
there is a knot in your body that I cannot…

(Source: five--a--day)

Because of this article, you’ll always be able to Google me and find out that I have this sickness. You’ll know how bad it got.

And I’m telling you anyway. Because here’s the part of the story that matters: once I got the diagnosis, got the pills, and got in touch with a therapist I really liked, I woke up in the morning. And I was happy, genuinely happy, for the first time in a very long time. That’s what matters about my nervous breakdown—or yours, or anyone’s. When I got the help I needed, I was able to recover.

And I’m lucky. I know that. That’s why I say that having my breakdown and going to the hospital was the “easy part.” Everyone I spoke to after the fact who had any experience at all with serious illness told me that dealing with the diagnosis would be a lifelong project: there would be more doctors, different medicines, and the long, hard work of taking care of myself. Plenty of people have received diagnoses, struggled with them for years, and still died from their illnesses. But plenty of other people never receive a diagnosis, or the care they need to get better. They spend their lives trying to move forward, knowing something is wrong and blaming themselves for falling apart—or being blamed by the people who love them. No matter how scary it was to be hospitalized and diagnosed with a mental illness, it was also a blessing. Because it gave me what I needed to get well.
jordansjourneyto130:

This is the greatest thing I have ever seen. People do not understand that mental illnesses, such as depression, are actual chemical imbalances in your body. They are not brought on by choice. My dad was diagnosed with depression. He was so ashamed of it that he hid it from me and my brothers. A month later, he killed himself. The stigma that comes with mental illness made my Dad embarrassed to talk to his own kids about this problem because he felt like less of a man.
Erase the stigma. The more we talk about mental illness, the less likely it will end in suicide.

jordansjourneyto130:

This is the greatest thing I have ever seen. People do not understand that mental illnesses, such as depression, are actual chemical imbalances in your body. They are not brought on by choice. My dad was diagnosed with depression. He was so ashamed of it that he hid it from me and my brothers. A month later, he killed himself. The stigma that comes with mental illness made my Dad embarrassed to talk to his own kids about this problem because he felt like less of a man.

Erase the stigma. The more we talk about mental illness, the less likely it will end in suicide.

(Source: losingthe-war)

Do you ever have those days when you just feel like you’re in a funk? You just can’t shake those heavy, sinking feelings? Maybe you’re feeling stressed, empty, scared or stuck. In essence, you just don’t feel like yourself.

As a way to improve mental health in Canada, Blok Design worked with Partners for Mental Health to come up with a way to draw people into a conversation, encouraging an open dialogue. Using bright colors that represented a spectrum of moods, they got people on the street to, literally, wear their emotions on their sleeves.

What a great idea for you to reflect on your emotions.

If you are talking about the death penalty now, you are talking about closing the barn door after the mare is a mile down the road, and if you are talking about gun control, you’re bringing a knife to a gun fight. The problem we have in America is a deep cultural denial that there are thousands of damaged human beings whom we ignore until they explode, and who get worse while—and because—we ignore them.

Here’s what we should have learned by now: You do not mend broken people by trying to close off their access to guns, because they will get them online or use homemade bombs instead, and you do not deter other broken people by killing the ones who crack. If you were to ask Jared Loughner or James Holmes about Timothy McVeigh, your answer would probably be a blank stare.

Gun control is good for a lot of things. It will keep kids from killing themselves with their dads’ unsecured guns. It will make it harder for drug dealers to kill each other, and it will save lives in ordinary robberies. It might even prevent wildfires in the west. But it will not stop the mentally ill from reaping carnage because the proximate cause of their carnage is disease, not hardware.

If you say that a ten-round clip would have limited the damage in Aurora, and you might be right. But you also might be wrong, because Holmes might have walked in instead with a bomb. Either way, here we are arguing about how to limit the damage broken people do rather than talking about how to mend broken people.

Of course nobody needs an AK-47 or a twenty-round clip, and the Supreme Court ruling making it more difficult for communities to restrict access to guns was deeply unsound. But before we get sidetracked for the umpteenth time talking about limiting access to certain calibers, or muzzle velocities, or clip size, we should perhaps start talking about how we can identify broken people—not just when they walk into a gun store to purchase a weapon (although certainly there as well), but also when they apply to college, or for a driver’s license, or do anything else that might call them to the attention of people who are trained to look.

A CNN article published in 2010 states that mental illness among Latinos and whites in the U.S. are about the same but that whites were 60 percent more likely to receive mental health treatment. Only 20 percent of Latinos with a psychological disorder consult a general health-care provider and 10 percent contact a mental-health specialist. So in addition to ignorance, our communities often lack resources and time. Many of us are uninsured. It angers me that mental health, something so vital to living, is treated like a luxury. The stigma of psychological disorders is also a huge hurdle. Latinos don’t want to be labeled “loco/a.” To some, mental illness is a manifestation of weakness, which is not easy for many immigrants to accept.

I need to learn new skillz

(Source: ilickoldpeople)

More Information